Southern Snowpocalypse: The Good in Humanity

As some of you may or may not know, the south was taken by surprise when a “massive snowstorm” (by our standards) hit the city of Atlanta. Everyone panicked when we received over two inches of snow within a couple of hours. The sudden onslaught of snow and ice caused schools to release students, businesses to release employees and everyone to drive home at literally, the EXACT same time. The city of Atlanta became gridlocked and people were stuck on the roads for hours and hours.

Due to the massive gridlock combined with the terrible weather conditions, people deserted their cars, got into massive accidents and ran out of gas. One woman was even forced to give birth in her car. People were walking on the side of the roads trying to stay warm and find shelter while dodging sliding vehicles. Some people were so far away from their homes that they were forced to take refuge in nearby businesses for the night.

I’ve heard numerous opinions regarding the state Atlanta was in over the past two days. Some compared it to AMC’s ‘The Walking Dead’ series, calling it a “snowpocalypse.” Some referred to it as “sheer stupidity” and “completely avoidable.”

As a resident of Atlanta, I have my own opinion. I believe that it was a necessary reminder of just how good and kind humanity can be. It restored my faith in people and made me proud to consider myself an “Atlantan.”

I was completely overwhelmed by the utmost kindness, compassion and selflessness I witnessed from the citizens of Atlanta. People were helping others in ways that were truly heartwarming and some acts of kindness brought tears to my eyes.

People were opening their own homes to complete and total strangers so that they were not forced to spend the night in the cold.

Drivers who were stuck on the icy roads were helping other drivers by providing them with water, clothes, gas and even a much-needed push out of an icy spot.

Local businesses such as Kroger and Home Depot were opening their stores for people who were not able to find shelter. Schools remained open for students who couldn’t find a way home, feeding them and keeping them safe until their parents could reach them.

Overall, the Southern Snowpocalypse of 2014 taught me a valuable lesson about helping others. There is always a way to help and when catastrophe strikes, big or small:

|| Keep your home, heart and mind open to all. ||

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s